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Building a strong foundation for the future

Why learn how to code now?

Piano lessons? Violin lessons? Mandarin lessons? Coding is the language of the future.


Because it helps to start young

Every year it gets more and more difficult to get into a Computer Science major at UBC, or any university, really. See here, here, and here for a glimpse of how hard it is these days. But learning how to code is still super valuable.

Even if you don't pursue CS as a major, coding gives you the ability to build applications that could really make an impact in the world

Because it's a viable career path that is rewarding financially

It's one of the few majors that lets graduates land a 6-figure job right out of college. The average salaries at major tech cities for a software engineer is $130000. As a new grad at top tech companies (Facebook, Airbnb, Google, Uber, Twitter, etc), total compensation (salary + stock) can amount to up to $200000 per year.


Because it's everywhere and the language of the future.

In the for-profit sector, programming is automating things in every single occupation. Lawyers, doctors, financiers, you name it. Programming is here to stay.

Because it's fun and productive

Coding is more than just learning a new language. It gives you the tools to be able to create websites, apps, games, do research, and a multitude of other things! The possibilities are endless


Because it's fulfilling

Knowing how to code will enable you to do so so many things that are incredibly fulfilling. AI can outperform doctors when it comes to diagnosing skin cancer, and are making massive progress in radiology. There are websites that many software engineers contribute to fight human trafficking, apps to track outbreaks and pregnancies in difficult-to-reach places, and so so much more.

Coding gives you the tools to build something...anything really from scratch and gives you the ability to reach billions of people regardless of your age.

We can't think of anything more exciting than that.


Why learn how to code now?

Piano lessons? Violin lessons? Mandarin lessons? Coding is the language of the future.


Because it helps to start young

Every year it gets more and more difficult to get into a Computer Science major at UBC, or any university, really. See here, here, and here for a glimpse of how hard it is these days. But learning how to code is still super valuable. Even if you don't pursue CS as a major, coding gives you the ability to build applications that could really make an impact in the world


Because it's a viable career path that is rewarding financially

It's one of the few majors that lets graduates land a 6-figure job right out of college. The average salaries at major tech cities for a software engineer is $130000. As a new grad at top tech companies (Facebook, Airbnb, Google, Uber, Twitter, etc), total compensation (salary + stock) can amount to up to $200000 per year.


Because it's everywhere and the language of the future.

In the for-profit sector, programming is automating things in every single occupation. Lawyers, doctors, financiers, you name it. Programming is here to stay.

Because it's fun and productive

Coding is more than just learning a new language. It gives you the tools to be able to create websites, apps, games, do research, and a multitude of other things! The possibilities are endless.


Because it's fulfilling

Knowing how to code will enable you to do so so many things that are incredibly fulfilling. AI can outperform doctors when it comes to diagnosing skin cancer, and are making massive progress in radiology. There are websites that many software engineers contribute to fight human trafficking, apps to track outbreaks and pregnancies in difficult-to-reach places, and so so much more.

Coding gives you the tools to build something...anything really from scratch and gives you the ability to reach billions of people regardless of your age.

We can't think of anything more exciting than that.


Polyglot vs Bootcamp

Flexibile and no-frills

Bootcamps love to advertise their 40+ hour per week courses, but we know for a fact that most of the day is spent doing self-directed studies. Lecture time and time spent with their lecturers oftentimes are far and few in between.

That’s why we cut the frills and provide mentorship and collaborative building at the most critical parts of learning: Immediately after learning something new. Think of it as having your lecture, then tutorials, and they happen 3 times a week. We’ve found that past that stage, most studies are self-directed.

Learning on your own is something we don’t believe we should be charging you on.

 

Bootcamp

$9800
  • Full-stack development
  • Fixing an already implemented Ruby on Rails codebase
  • Javascript +Javascript Frameworks
  • Algorithms + Fundamentals
  • Midterm group project
  • Capstone Group Project
  • Websockets
  • Elevator-pitch interview practice
  • 40+ hour per week commitment. Instr. hours unknown.
  • 10 weeks. 1 week is self-directed.